Current The Cut Science Café

Current The Cut Science Café Current The Cut Science Café Current The Cut Science Café Current The Cut Science Café Current The Cut Science Café

7pm–9pm, £4. The Cut Science Café provides an informal, friendly environment in which to discuss the latest ideas in science and technology, whilst enjoying a drink and delicious food from our licensed café, which will be open from 6.30pm.

Talks start at 7pm, the evening ends at 9pm. The sessions comprise an informal introduction; the talks and then a refreshment break, followed by the Q&A section. The dates for September, October and November 2018 are as noted below, together with a brief description of the topics. For more details check www.newcut.org or email us at info@newcut.org

You, The Scientist and the Farmer Thursday 27 September

The Cut Science Cafe programme for Autumn 2018 had a stimulating start on 27 September!
We met Dr Rachel Wells of the John Innes Centre [JIC] and her fantastic team, Jessica, Lucy and Mikhaela and learnt a great deal about the Brassica world. Dr Laura Dixon was our super chairperson for the evening, coordinating the questions to all members of the team. Lucy specialised in Bee interactions, Jessica on insect pests and Mikhaela on the cancer fighting properties of broccoli.  
Dr Rachel Wells provided a wide reaching and fascinating overview of the incredible breadth of research taking place within the Brassica family as well as giving us a detailed view of just how long it takes to get research out of the lab and onto our plates in this case. There was active audience participation with many searching questions and knowledgeable debate particularly on environmental issues such as agrochemical use of Neonicotinoids.

Science in Art Tuesday 30 October
Dr Jan Athis our chairperson welcomed everyone, especially our speaker Mr Paul Osborne.  We enjoyed an exciting ‘mercurial’ journey from the start of photography to the present day, courtesy of a broken thermometer in the bottom of a cupboard. We learnt that after all, the old methods are still the best, not golden oldies though, its Silver that wins the day! Staying with the photographic theme we saw fascinating depictions of big data creating ‘maps’ of wind and flight paths.
We left the two dimensional behind, and ‘climbed’ into the world of augmented reality; unlike virtual reality it does not ‘create’ a virtual world, but adds layers of digital information onto ‘real’ physical objects.   Before we got too spaced out Paul brought us back down to Earth. However he mixed with Fire and water, explaining the creation of Raku ware. Elemental my dear Watson, but this time it was Iron and Copper to the fore. We saw the beautiful coloured glazes resulting from physical and chemical processes. Paul also described the use of mathematical modelling to create Art. The whole talk was indeed a fascinating Interplay as Paul termed it, between Art and Science.
 

A Green Revolution THURSDAY 29 NOVEMBER
Dr Jan Athis our chairperson welcomed everyone, especially our speaker Mr Paul Osborne. We enjoyed an exciting ‘mercurial’ journey from the start of photography to the present day, courtesy of a broken thermometer in the bottom of a cupboard. We learnt that after all, the old methods are still the best, not golden oldies though, its Silver that wins the day! Staying with the photographic theme we saw fascinating depictions of big data creating ‘maps’ of wind and flight paths. We then left the two dimensions behind, as we ‘climbed’ into the world of augmented reality; unlike virtual reality it does not ‘create’ a virtual world, but adds layers of digital information onto ‘real’ physical objects. Before we got too spaced out Paul brought us back down to Earth. However he mixed with Fire and water,
explaining the creation of Raku ware. Elemental my dear Watson, but this time it was Iron and Copper to the fore. We saw the beautiful coloured glazes resulting from physical and chemical
processes and moved on to mathematical modelling to create Art. The whole talk was indeed a fascinating Interplay as Paul termed it, between Art and Science.